You’re sitting at the beach with all your boring relatives. To keep the conversation going, you say:

“I decided that I’m going to set some new goals for this year. I’m not happy just staying in the same place year after year. I’m not waiting for January 1. I’m setting new goals now.”

Now, what is your brother-in-law going to say? He can’t appear to be a boring, unmotivated jerk. I’m sure he won’t say:

“Well, I hope next year will be just the same as this year. I enjoyed working 50 weeks and really appreciated the two weeks I got for vacation. And my family loved the peace and quiet around the house when I worked all that overtime. Yep, I sure hope I get to do it again.”

Instead, maybe your brother-in-law will say:

“You know what? I’m not that happy with only two weeks of vacation. I can’t see spending the entire year working, and doing the same thing year after year. Maybe I should think about a change?”

And now the conversation begins. :)

A few years ago, I had this amazing conversation with a distributor in Seattle. He said:

“I talked to all of my relatives, and they said “No.” I talked to all of my friends, and they said “No.” So where can I find some hot prospects?”

I asked this distributor:

“Do you think every one of your relatives is lazy, unmotivated, and wants to work until age 65? Do you think every one of your friends is lazy, unmotivated, and wants to work until age 65?”

The distributor agreed that at least some of his relatives and friends wanted a better future.

So I continued:

“You are obviously saying the wrong things to people. You don’t need new people to ruin. You simply need to fix what you are saying.”

Many years ago an attorney, Barry LePatner, made the following statement:

“Good judgment is usually the result of experience. And experience is frequently the result of bad judgment. But to learn from the experience of others requires those who have the experience to share the knowledge with those who follow.”

In other words, we can go out and make our own mistakes by trial and error, or we can observe or listen to those who came before us and have made those mistakes already.

This is one of the duties of our sponsor. Our sponsor can save us valuable time and money by letting us know what works, and what doesn’t work.

Of course this is assuming our sponsor actually did something. :)

If our sponsor spent his career moving computer pixels from one side of the computer screen to the other, chit-chatting on social media, or reading endless positive attitude books … well, then our sponsor wouldn’t have much experience to share with us.

So let’s make sure we are great sponsors. Let’s actually do something. Let’s have plenty of experience in prospecting, presenting, and working with “live” people.

Our downline deserves our experience.

Where should you look for prospects? Good prospects? The kind of prospects that join?

Simply look at where you enrolled your last five distributors. Where and how did you meet these prospects?

Success leaves clues.

So instead of finding new and unique places to locate future distributors, go back to where you located the last five distributors.

But failure leaves clues also.

Take a look at why your last five prospects told you they weren’t interested. Was there a common theme? And where did you locate these uninterested prospects?

Many times we are standing too close to our successes and failures. We need to step back and observe to see if there are clues.

A distributor comes to you and says:

“I can’t find anybody to talk to. Where can I find some good prospects?”

You know this distributor is clueless. Hasn’t got a chance. Doesn’t even know the first set of skills for his network marketing business.

He has already talked to good prospects, but has ruined them by saying the wrong things. And now he wants new people to ruin?

When you try to get him to learn the basic skills, he protests by saying things like:

“You can’t say the wrong thing to the right person.”

Well, I know I have said the wrong things to the right people and they didn’t join. But, the distributor insists on spending money and hours of wasted time and frustration looking for new people to ruin.

I guess someone needs to sit down with the new, clueless distributor and have a heart-to-heart talk about prospecting.

Try asking this question with difficult prospects:

“How long can you wait?”

When a prospect says that he doesn’t have time to build a business, but wants to earn $10,000 a month, ask him how long he can wait until he starts earning $10,000 a month.

He might say that he needs to work on earning more income now. Or, maybe he says that he can only wait six months or a year, but he knows that he eventually has to earn more money.

This question makes the assumption that the prospect will join, and that his only decision is how soon to join. It certainly makes the prospect think of the consequences of not joining – never having that increased income.

Do you have trouble getting prospects on an opportunity presentation teleconference call? Are they afraid of being “sold” by listening to the sales presentation?

Relax your prospects by offering to have them listen to a “training call.” They can listen to one of your teleconference trainings without the fear of being “sold.”