When we sponsor a new distributor, what is our promise to him or her and what is our responsibility?

Hmmm, I think the word “sponsor” means to take the new person under our guidance and give them the skills and direction to build their business.

That means we must personally learn the skills to make our networking business work, and make those skills available for the new person to learn.

Of course, we could just refuse to give the new person the skills, but that’s not an option with integrity.

So let’s not pat our new distributor on the back and say, “You’re on your own. Make some sales so I can get a bigger commission check.”

Some have done nothing, but actually have pretty good information that can help us.

Others, well, maybe they haven’t done anything and have nothing new to offer.

So I don’t discount gurus. I try to learn from everyone, whether they are successful or not. But, I also try to be careful and think through other people’s advice before I test it. :)

Having good principles will keep us grounded so we don’t buy into some guru who has nothing to offer. I like using principles such as common sense, empathy for the viewpoints of prospects, and a desire to help people who actually want what we offer.

Well, according to some distributors, the best time to start shrinking their business is right after they start. Why?

We all know that we are either growing or shrinking. Our personal development doesn’t stand still.

Yet, many new distributors insist on avoiding their upline’s training, refusing to read books, and generally stopping their growth the moment they leave school. That’s a shame.

So here is a question you can ask your distributors,

“Do you want to come to our next training session, or are you happy to have your business peak at the current level?”

Hopefully, they get the picture. :)

“Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life. Don’t be trapped by dogma – which is living with the results of other people’s thinking. Don’t let the noise of other’s opinions drown out your own inner voice. And most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary.”

- Steve Jobs

“Goals must be specific.”

The more specific our goals, the easier it is for us to recognize opportunities that will help us achieve those goals.

I’m sure you too are tired of everyone saying we must set more goals. But what if we changed it slightly to say:

“Setting goals is easy, but achieving goals is difficult.”

We should invest more time in learning the skills to achieve those goals.

The answer is easy: guilt and embarrassment.

Think about it. When you are asked for referrals, what’s the first thing that comes into your mind?

You think,

“Oh, no. What if I recommend my friend and this salesperson is rude, offensive, pushy, dishonest or a jerk? Will I lose my friend’s respect and friendship? Rather than run the risk, I’ll just pretend that I don’t know anyone I can refer.”

We don’t want to feel guilty or embarrassed. That’s why we pretend we are hermits, orphaned, or extreme introverts.

The solution?

When you ask for referrals, make your prospect or customer feel comfortable by:

* Explaining exactly the type of person you are looking for.
* Explaining that you will be courteous and polite, just as you were with him or her.
* Explaining what you will say or do with the referral.
* Explaining that you will first send a courtesy letter/email to let the prospect know that you will be calling.