Imagine this is the relative effectiveness of inviting people:

* 50% Endorsement. (If someone endorses the meeting, half of the people invited will come.)

* 10% Referral. (Looks like an endorsement is five times more effective than a simple referral.)

* 3% Two-step. (Get someone to answer an ad, and then send them more stuff and invite them.)

* 1.0% Cold call. (Gee, you would have to make 50 cold calls to equal one endorsement.)

* 0.5% A simple email inviting a person to your meeting.

These are relative numbers, but you get the idea.

Instead of running ads, etc. – make personal contact with one, two or three people. Build a relationship and invite them. That will be more effective than hundreds of emails.

Prospect: “I can’t afford $49 for a distributor kit.”

Sponsor: “You have cable television, right? Which will make you more money? Cable television or our opportunity?”

If your prospect doesn’t subscribe to cable television, just modify your approach for the following:

* Extended mobile phone plan
* Smoking
* Beer
* Golf
* Eating out at restaurants
* Movies
* Pizza

When you buy something, you give the seller some money, receive your merchandise, and the deal is completed. That’s it.

When someone asks you to join his network marketing company, this isn’t a simple, one-time transaction. You are being asked for a long-term commitment. You’ll want to know more about the program, the people involved, etc. You want to be comfortable with everything before you make this major decision.

That’s why “selling” doesn’t work well when sponsoring prospects.

What does work is “relationships.” Your prospect will join if he knows, likes and trusts you. This is why people join.

If you want to be an effective recruiter, concentrate more of your presentation on relationships and less on features, benefits, and facts about your program.

With his health failing for several months, a poor distributor rested on his deathbed. Throughout his long illness, the distributor’s worthless sponsor made daily visits. One day, the distributor weakly motioned for the worthless sponsor to come nearer.

The distributor whispered to the worthless sponsor:

“You have been at my side through all my bad times and suffering.

“When I lost my best leader, you were there to support me.

“When my opportunity meeting caught on fire, you were there at my side.

“When my downline quit to join another company, you stayed with me.

“And every day that I’ve been sick, you’ve been here.

“Do you know what I’m thinking?”

The worthless sponsor replied, “No, what are you thinking?”

The distributor replied, “I think you’re bad luck!”

If you use conference calls, consider this idea.

Have two separate training calls.

Call #1: For distributors who have sponsored less than four people.
Call #2: For distributors who have sponsored four or more people.

Your training can be more focused on each group’s needs, but the big benefit is that everyone on Call #1 wants to graduate to Call #2.

They’ll stretch their comfort zone and try to sponsor their four distributors right away – so they can be on the call with the leaders and learn the really great stuff.

Conference call training saves money on hotel rooms, long distance traveling, and gives you more free time. A single training once a week can reach everyone in your downline.

It’s hard to say which quote is my favorite. I have so many that I enjoy.

Here is one quote that is certainly one of my favorites. It helps me to look at new possibilities and to practice tolerance for others’ beliefs.

Richard Brooke wrote:

“As humans, we are incredibly closed-minded and arrogant. We actually believe that what we think is the truth is TRUE, and that what someone else believes is just THEIR OPINION. This arrogance and foolishness sticks us with our beliefs, blinding us to any other possibilities – possibilities that may propel us toward success.”

When listening to someone’s strange viewpoints, I pause, think of this quote, and try to understand how this person came to create these strange viewpoints.